Latest Event Updates

5 STAR FRIDAY — SUMMIT SS TRIPOD

Posted on Updated on

“I’ve had this tripod for about a year now and have hundreds of hours of use on it in a variety of terrain. I have used it as a shooting platform for my rifle, bowstand for my G5, mounted my spotting scope, binos, and even rangefinder on it. Packs small, relatively light, quick to deploy, and the ball head allows for very smooth, fine panning. Definitely a must-pair item with any of the HD Vortex binos for those long glassing sessions that require you to get comfortable. Makes it easy to find muleys bedded in the shade a mile away, or spotting antelopes antlers barely poking out of the tall grass at 2000 yards. Great Product!”
-Josh 

hd-binos-tripod

VIP STORY – TOM OWENS

Posted on

Unlimited. Unconditional. Lifetime Warranty.

 

DEER XING

Posted on Updated on

This sign has been removed due to an increased amount of tree stands and ground blinds lining the roads.

deer-crossing

RISE AND SHINE!

Posted on Updated on

What a beautiful view to wake up to.

sunrise

FALL IS HERE – THE INK BLOT

Posted on Updated on

Professional intervention is sought to deal with Mark and his recent office behavior.

THE GLASSING TECHNIQUE YOU SHOULD BE USING, BUT AREN’T

Posted on Updated on

Glassing with high-powered binoculars mounted on a tripod with a quality head is one of the most underutilized, yet most effective ways to tear apart the landscape in search of game. Using this technique, you’re going to see more, walk less and execute calculated stalks. Once you do it, you won’t look back.

The Advantages

1. Look Mom, no hands: Hand-holding high powered binoculars like our 15×56 and 20×56 Kaibab HD’s can be an exercise in futility. Natural movement and perceived hand shake not particularly bothersome with a lower power binocular becomes truly magnified. Lock the same bino down on a tripod and you’ll experience greatly enhanced, shake-free, fluid viewing.

2. Two is better than one: Is it easier to see using both of your eyes, or just one? Exactly. Glassing at long distances with both eyes is more natural, comfortable and greatly reduces eye fatigue. This is not to say spotting scopes don’t have a place while utilizing this technique—they do. It’s just after you’ve found that buck, bull, or conspicuous detail requiring further evaluation.

3. Slow down: Setting up shop with high-powered, tripod-mounted binoculars inherently causes you to slow down and systematically pick apart terrain piece by piece. Tines, legs, out of place horizontal lines and other conspicuous details lost by a cursory glance are revealed. Heck, even if an animal is standing in the wide open, it will be easier to spot.

4. Spot movement by not moving: By taking your movement out of the glassing equation, you are much more likely to spot movement—including tail flicks, ear twitches and subtle head turns. While hunting Coues deer in Arizona, our outfitter found a buck when it licked its nose while bedded securely under a palo verde tree. We ended up killing it.

5. Dude, relax: Tripod glassing alleviates muscle strain and is easier on your arms, back and neck. If you spot something requiring investigation, simply stop and watch it for a while – hands free, shake free and fatigue free. The detail that caught your eye may soon materialize into an entire animal.

Read the rest of this entry »

WORLD SHOOTING CHAMPIONSHIP

Posted on Updated on

Good luck out there Jerry Michilick!

jerry-michilick-worldshooting

FALL IS HERE – THE COLOGNE

Posted on Updated on

You know fall is here when you change your cologne…

 

5 UNDER-THE-RADAR ESSENTIALS FOR YOUR WESTERN HUNT

Posted on Updated on

vtx-essentials

Wading through gear options for a hunt can be a daunting task—and on a western hunt, where tall mountains, open landscapes, and huge tracts of land present unique challenges—the right equipment can make all the difference. Below are 5 under-the-radar pieces of gear that may not jump out as essential, but should be given consideration.

art_gear-poles

Trekking Poles
I’ll admit, the first time I saw my good hunting buddy using trekking poles, I questioned his ability to pee standing up. Then I tried them. Today, if I’m hitting the mountains, they make the gear cut every time. Trekking poles distribute the work between your legs and arms, as well as provide balance and stability in rough, steep country. From a safety standpoint, they have saved me from some nasty spills on several occasions. Good trekking poles are like always having that perfectly placed piece of brush to pull yourself up when you need it. Some shelters are designed to be erected with trekking poles, giving them valuable dual-purpose status. They really do make sense. The game we chase has four legs (coincidence, I think not) and they are ideally suited for the terrain they inhabit. They cover ground, and what we consider highly technical terrain, with ease. Give yourself the same advantage with a set of trekking poles.

Read the rest of this entry »

FALL IS HERE — THE GAME CALLS

Posted on Updated on

The countdown has begun … How many days until Fall is here for you?